Bipolar

1 Word to Describe It

The terms to underline and name the hatred of people with other skin tones, gender, or orientation exist. We know when we hear racism, sexism and homophobia and can stand against them. But when Uncle Joe is diagnosing his barber as so crazy, completely bipolar, what do we say then?

A term that came to mind this week, would be to say Uncle Joe was acting like a stigmatizer.

I made it up, because I couldn’t think of a single word to describe prejudice against someone who was neurodivergent. Really bothered me, because if there is no word for it, the insults, the snubs and the derision didn’t really happen. And, we know they did.

What are your thoughts about the new term? Can you think of another?

Happy Manic Monday! -Rebecca

Bipolar

6 Health Care Stigma Solutions

A health exam can be a stressful time for someone with bipolar. In my experience, situations like a doctor’s office where my chart reveals my diagnosis can lead to prejudicial treatment at times. I’ll tell the bodily symptom of my complaint; and see a small smile play at the corner of the nurse or doctor’s lips.

You are now entering the Bipolar Zone.

Any story you tell is a break from reality

Any emotion is theater

Any confidence is self aggrandizement

It’s as if they have in ear buds and can’t hear you.

What to do?

1. Meditate before you go

2. Ask questions calmly as possible

3. Speak your truth

4. Bring a list of your questions/concerns

5. Bring a relative or close friend

6. Role play what you want to say beforehand with someone close to you

What is your experience with stigma? What advice would you give?

It’s Manic Monday and that’s good news! Thanks for reading and commenting. -Rebecca

 

 

Communication in Black and White Photo: Rebecca Cuningham